Take the Three Greek Sisters Home (Giveaway)

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IMG_3192-2Last week I had the pleasure of meeting the Three Greek Sisters. Born & raised in Toronto’s Greektown (The Danforth), these ladies have just released a self-published cookbook, “Around the Greek Table”.

Betty, Eleni and Samantha Bakopoulos share family recipes with the reader with one eye on on tradition and the other with plating traditional Greek dishes with panache, flair and that “lady’s touch”.

pictured left to right - Samantha, myself, Betty and Eleni
pictured left to right - Samantha, myself, Betty and Eleni

I gladly accepted their offer to join them as they gave a cooking class to some Canadian military wives here in Toronto. The Three Greek Sisters (or as I call them, Trio Belle Greca) instructed the ladies on how to make their own Baklava (rolled) cigars.

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All the ingredients were provided, instruction was given, a watchful eye overlooked some of the ladies who were timid with phyllo pastry but in the end…the military wives took to the ease of instruction from Trio Belle Greca and all participants took home their assembled Baklava Cigars for baking (and a quick vanishing act from the dessert table).IMG_3212-1

Christmas is upon us and “Around the Greek Table” would make for a wonderful Christmas gift. The book can be purchased from the Three Greek Sisters Website or at Amazon.IMG_3217-1

Why should you buy the book? Not because it’s self-published, or that the three sisters are like you and I, or that these women assumed a “take charge” attitude and recipe-tested, photographed, funded and self-published this book.IMG_3194-2

The cookbook contains:

112 photos,

105 easy to read recipes,

60 vegetarian dishes,

22 delicious dinners,

18 impressive appetizers,

13 desserts and,

12 menu suggestions.

The photography is excellent, the recipes work and the sisters even thrown in some clever techniques and plating ideas that I’m excited to try out too!

The Three Greek Sisters were kind enough to give me an autographed copy to me for a giveaway promotion. All you have to do is leave a comment ON THE BLOG (only one comment will count in the draw) and a winner will be chosen by this Friday, December 18th at 6PM EST.

For your comment to qualify, please share with us all a special memory, be it funny, sentimental, touching you have about a sibling (or close relative for those only children). When I met the Three Greek Sisters, I could definitely sense a strong blond amongst them…almost telepathy and I want to see if anyone else has such a strong family bond.IMG_3195-1

The giveaway is open to all readers and the winner will be contacted via email.

Καλή τύχη (good luck)!

If you are not reading this post in a feed reader or at  http://kalofagas.ca then the site you are reading is illegally publishing copyrighted material. Contact me at truenorth67 AT gmail DOT COM. All recipes, text and photographs in this post are the original creations & property of the author.

© 2007-2009 Peter Minakis

© 2009,
Peter Minakis

. All rights reserved.

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85 Comments for “Take the Three Greek Sisters Home (Giveaway)”

says:

This is great! Good on them! My “fondest” memory includes my older brother who used to wheel me around in a home made go-kart…until one day he let me go at the top of a hill and off I went! I ended up with a broken arm! Some things you never forget!

says:

Peter you will not believe this. Suzanne, the one with the green sweater, is a long time friend. We worked together, years ago, in Fredericton, NB. She told me about the cooking class, last week. I wish I knew you would be there. I would have told her to say hello from me.

Now for the contest, my touching memory is when my sister flew to Newfoundland to meet us for a camping trip. I had not seen my sisters in a year and we had the most memorable time.

says:

My family always bonds over music. We all have very broad tastes and enjoy each others music picks. My favorite memories of my sister and my dad are of us going to concerts together. My sister and me in the first row, singing and dancing. My dad somewhere at the bar, enjoying his drink and the music. Such good times.

tc

says:

A wonderful endeavour, good for them!

I remember when my sister and I first started to experiment in the kitchen; we were baking cookies. The instruction was to fold in the chocolate chips, my sister gently began to stir in the chocolate chips by hand and I turned on the hand mixer to speed up the process; her hand was slightly mangled, with no permanent damange.

Needless to say, she – not I – became the family baker.

says:

I remember arguing with my brother about how unfair it was that our father had named the family restaurant after him. I stopped complaining when I realized that customers called my dad by my brother’s name (he couldn’t use his own since there was already a Greek restaurant in town using his name), and they probably would have tried to call him “Stamatia” if he’d named it after me!

Also, all of the crazy omelettes we would make together. I still think he was a genius to put steak sauce in with his peppers…

(P.S., I love it when Freddy Beach randomly comes up in the blogosphere!)

says:

Wow fabulous! Great cookbook! I have way too many memories of me and my 3 siblings! We spent a lot of time in the kitchen when we were young, baking, cooking, stretching taffy in between board games, Mah Jong and basketball outside.We still have fun together like kids.

says:

Oh, they are all so cute! Just looking at them reminds me of my three daughters. My memory would be baking Christmas cookies with them!

says:

Thanks to introducing us to these wonderful ladies. Here is one of the memories I will never forget: When we left England I was 9 years old but my two brothers and a sister stayed there. My eldest brother and sister would visit Cyprus once in a while but my youngest brother, seven years older than me eventually got married and they moved to Australia. Everyday I was secretly wishing that the doorbell would ring and he would come back and surprise us but that never happened and we met again about thirty years later.

I mean… Thanks for introducing us..
See, I was moved remembering this story..

says:

A great book and great give-away!
I was an only child, but had a step brother for awhile. I remember that he was playing in the bathroom and spilled red nail polish all over the place. We played hookie together for the morning and cleaned it all up. & Felt very close as co-conspirators and working hard together to get it all cleaned up. No small feat for children.

says:

I heard the Three Sisters on CBC Radio and am glad you reminded me about them and giving the link to their website. If I don’t win, I’m putting this book on my Christmas list!
Love your blog!

says:

My memory is meeting my half brother for the first time in 2006. He currently lives in Seattle and his mother wouldn’t let him see my father growing up, so he eventually stopped caring about my father. Finally, his fiance convinced him that he should reconnect, so he came to Chicago w/ her and we all met. We were together from 1 int he afternoon until about 4 in the morning, jsut hanging out, taking the boat onto the lake, going to Greek towen for dinner and coffee, then eventually sitting on the boat and talking all night. It was one of the best days of my life. :)

says:

The sisters are adorable. Wish I could have taken that class. Funny memory of one of my brothers: I was about 5 or 6, and he was doing some bb gun practice in the basement, but got my rear instead of the target.

says:

when i was a wee little girl, i decided to run away from home. i grabbed my favorite stuffed animal and began to walk down our driveway. my older brother chased after me, swiped my toy, and ran back to the house–he knew i wouldn’t go anywhere without my fluffy friend. it’s not the best story, but it has a permanent place in my memory. :)

Melanie T

says:

I must have been about four and my sister about 6. I remember trying to dig to China in our gravel driveway. We really thought we might get there.

says:

I think my fondest memory of my brother is the phone call he made to me when his first son was born. He was so happy & crying on the phone about how beautiful the baby was.

AppleTree

says:

My sister is 14 years older than I am, and as a child, I always looked up to her, so much so that I told my kindergarten teacher that we were twins.

I have many best memories with her now that we’ve become older and the best of friends, but perhaps the most meaningful is that I laugh with my sister like no one else. We find humor in things that neither of out husbands even care to reason out, but we laugh until we cry and snort, and then we laugh some more. That kind of bond is among the most beautiful and valuable parts of my life.

A

says:

Looks like a great book. One of my memories about times with my siblings is the first time we visited Greece, not speaking much Greek. My 11-year old brother, thinking that he was negotiating a deal for candy and cokes at a gas station in the Peleponneses, goes to my father for money. After my father got involved, he learned that my brother had engaged my 9 year old sister to the 14-year old son of the gas station owner for four cokes and some chocolate.

says:

I grew up in a big Sicilian family, which to me, is so much like big Greek families. Some of my fondest memories are of me and my Nonna and my bothers all gathering around the table to dip the cannoli ends in mini chips and pistachios. My Nonna is gone now and we all miss her cannoli, but those memories I have that took place around her table with my brothers will stay with me for a lifetime.

Cindy

says:

I remember playing “college” with my step sister when we were around 7 yrs old. We got a bunch of old books from a library sale. We would set up a dorm room and highlight things in the books. We didn’t know it then, but we both picked books on subjects we would study in college, for real.

says:

When we were travelling around in India last year, we went to a place called chennai and I had told my sis we are going there (before that we had stayed with her for 2 weeks and went from there o my parents place for 3 weeks) when we arrived in the ariport and came out we saw my sis, brother in law and their two kids waiting for us there, you can imagine what screaming there was when we saw them, i think that was a real surprise as they all had travelled from a another state to be there and we had such fun togethere for 2 days and they went back to their home and we continued travelling.
I can relate to what you talked aobut these three sisters. how close they are, we are three girls. And the only thing seperats us is the continet. one in US,one in europe and the other one in India.

Joe R

says:

Peter, your post always remind me that I want to visit Toronto someday. I was always unaware of Toronto’s strong Greek culture.

says:

One special memory (funny) of my brother is the time Mom and Dad left us home alone for a long weekend. We were teenagers and had to cook for ourselves. One night we made Spaghetti and Meatballs from scratch and when my brother dumped the hot and cooked pasta out into the colander the water hit the back of the sink, and came right back at him and landed on his bare feet. I still get a chuckle when I remember him howling and running around the kitchen while I rolled on the floor laughing at him. We have had so many good times together and most of them cooking together.

Peter you are so tall compared to those tiny ladies. This does look like a great book. I will have to look into it. But no one can beat the recipes of my favorite Greek Peter!

Joanne (GreekJo)

says:

Smart ladies…Bravo!! Impressive!
I don’t cook Greek often enough, so perhaps I should have a great cookbook to start off on the right foot ;)
One of my most memorable childhood memories (God, I have so many) was trying to make Frappe for my aunt in Greece. I was 12 years old and my family was vacationing in Greece for the summer. I asked thia if she wanted frappe and she said “yes”…so I proceeded to make frappe for her but couldn’t get the foam to develop on the top. So, I added dishwashing soap (gasp!!) to the frappe and gave it a good shake. It looked amazing but my aunt clued in on it immediately (mainly because my brother and I couldn’t contain ourselves from laughter). Suffice to say, thia Theodora did not drink the frappe. LOL!

Sifi M

says:

Nice contest!

My memory is mint-new. My mother and sister just traveled across the country to spend a week and we had a great time making our own version of koulourakia, sweetened up a bit for Christmas. We also made a preserved quince dish from Michael Psilakis’s new book.

Patricia

says:

I love reading all these comments!

When are you going to write a cookbook Peter? I love the recipes you blog.

Anyway, I have two precious foodie memories – one of my sister and one of my brother.

My sister once sat on me and forced me to eat an olive…. and I discovered I quite liked them! Since then I’ve always tried new foods, even when my first reaction is to cringe.

When I was five years old and just starting kindergarten, my brother (then 10) developed an elaborate game every day after school that involved me going into the garage and reciting a magic incantation. Invariably when I came out, little candies were sprinkled over the lettuce leaves in the back yard. The sense of wonder I felt at that returns when I think of it.

says:

Last time I saw my grandmother in Greece, I told her I was about to visit. So she asked what I’d like to eat and I said the usual… her meatballs are the best in the world… When I arrived, the meatballs from giagia were ready, and I ate so much, I could not leave the couch for the rest of that day! And when the evening came, I still had some more… I had missed her food so so much!

Congrats on the book! Inspiring to see young ladies cooking Greek food! Among my favourites too and I try to bring on the tradition in London, UK, by holding cookery classes with different Greek dishes and teaching people who are not Greek of our delicious dishes

says:

My sister is my very best friend! I have so many wonderful memories but one of my favorite is making rice crispy squares with her and giggling so much and actually messing them up so bad that we had to throw them out and remake. Many memories like that!

Nik

says:

My brother and I had a tradition every time we came back to America from Greece when we were children. We would be jet-lagged and not feel like going to sleep so we would pull out all our toys and play with them late into the night and often until the sun came up.

says:

I have a sad/happy story. We lost my 16 year old sister when I was 8. That next Christmas was a tough one. My older brother asked my Mom if we could get a puppy for Christmas because he wanted to cheer up the family. Christmas Eve, my Mom & brother came home w/ the cutest, whitest, fluffiest puppy I’d ever seen. I cried because I was so happy. Great memory of my bro doing something really, really nice.

says:

As you know I’m drooling all over your posts all the time. And I’m absolutely hooked on Greek cuisine.

I don’t have siblings but one my beautiful memories is tied to my cousin/godmother when she visited me one Summer, during the Total Solar Eclipse. It was just…impressive.

says:

I’m laughing to tears as I write this. When I was about 6 & my older brother 9, we were walking home from school. Not far in front of us was a boy my brother hated. My brother was yelling at him, and while he was, I asked him what the boys name was, and he told me… He said it was #*!*, a lovely 4 letter word.Since my brother was yelling at him, I decided to follow suit. Even when we got home. I just couldn’t figure out why my brother kept laughing so much. When we sat at the kitchen table and our parents asked how our day was, I replied “it was ok, until stupid #*!*# was mean to us. My brother started laughing,kicking me under the table, thinking I was going to get a beating for it. My dad calmly asked where I heard his name- and I told him- “Bobby told me”. My dad tiptoed my brother right out of his chair, and all I heard were crys promising not to do it again…lol… We still laugh about it to this day.

says:

I have the best sister in the world. Since I was a baby, she’s always there for me even today. She’s my best playmate when young, my confidante, my supporter, my protector and mother me like a mom. Although we are so different in personality and outlook in life, she supports me 100% and never forced me to be what I’m not.

Litsa

says:

While growing up my brother could not stand the smell of feta cheese on the table and refused to sit there unless it was removed. Imagine his shock a few months ago when my 1 year old daughter who was just learning to feed herself promptly gobbled up 2 pieces of feta and wanted more. Uncle Gerry had to pass it to her. Priceless!

says:

My younger sister and I seem to have our own language going on. I remember just after we both married, we all were sitting around and she and I were talking. We then asked the husbands what they thought of it. They both looked at us like we were from Mars and admitted that they never understand what we’re talking about – all they hear are grunts and groans. Haha! Our grandmother was visiting once and she slept in a bed in our room. She said that we were both talking in our sleep to each other! This looks like a great book! Now I’m going to go read everyone else’s comments :)

says:

While I lived in AZ for 9 years, my brother and I kind of grew apart. He was pretty mad I left home. When I moved back to Chicago this past summer, I only told my brother 2 days before I was to move into my apartment. Without even being asked, he took off of work, drove me all over thee city, unloaded my – albeit – small trailer full of stuff and was there for me whenever I needed him to be. We picked up right where we left off so many years ago.

says:

I was an only child, but I had the best Uncle who was more like a big brother. When it comes to food, he taught me how to appreciate eating vegetables raw with just a little salt & pepper on them. I think of him every time I snack and chop on vegetables during cooking.

Leslie

says:

The best thing I can say is about my four girls. When we go shopping or if we are just sitting around watching TV together, I notice that no one can finish a sentence, one of the other sisters usually finishes it. It just is fun to watch how they all know what they are thinking. I can understand what you say about telepathy.

Kelly

says:

This looks like a great website. I married into a very Greek family and enjoy the food, traditions and customs!

My favorite Christmas memory is one of tradition. My sisters and I have always chastised my mom for knowing too much useful information. Since I can remember every Christmas we have brought our trivial pursuit after dinner and each one of my three sisters and I try and take down my mom. While we each have only succeeded once, it is a memory I would not trade for the world.

Stefanie

says:

My sister and I have always been close, even though we’re over 4 years apart, so picking one memory is pretty hard. We really bonded as adults, though, when we went to Greece together for the first time when I was 24 and she was 28. We spent some time alone in the house our grandmother grew up in on the small island of Nisyros. Our great-aunt had put some upgrades into it, but we still had to rough it a bit. The hot-water heater did not work, so we filled 4 pots with water and heated them on the stove when we wanted to shower. Apparently, all four burners were not supposed to be on at the same time, which we learned when the circuits tripped off. We finally got enough warm water to wash ourselves with, so we went to the bathroom (a former outhouse that had been enclosed and attached to the house via a hall with no roof) in our bathing suits carrying big buckets of warm water. We had to wash each other’s hair so that we could be really efficient with the water. We hadn’t been that close since we were little girls and did actually bathe together!

Anna

says:

I had read about the greek sisters somewhere else but can’t remember where exactly. Anyway, it would indeed make for a great gift. My fondest memory of my sister is when we were home alone as teenagers and decided to make avgolemono soup with spoiled lemons; needless to say, it didn’t turn out so well but to this day, we can’t help but laugh with our crazy antics.

Mary

says:

This sounds like a great book! My favorite family food memory is about my sons. We spent the whole summer in Greece when they were 12 & 9 years old. They were used to the moderate weather of the Pacific Northwest. It was so hot most of the time that the youngest would only eat salad & ice cream!

Dimitri W

says:

Congrats to the 3 sisters on their first(!) book. My most special memory is traveling with my wife (1st generation Greek) in Greece to her father’s village to find the home he grew up in. We walked the streets and visited with a few folks in the square. A small amount of time to experience the environment that shaped her family for 3 generations.

Deborah

says:

I shared the most wonderful holiday last year with my older sister in Kephalonia.She had been nursing her sick husband through cancer and i wanted to treat her with a break.We had a bonding experience of such amazing proportions catching the Greek spirit on those icing sugar beaches where we would snooze and talk and snooze again and swim in the clearest sea. We sailed on colourful little boats,and ate exquisite pastries in roadside cafes and stopped to share time with the locals over a coffee or an ouzo in the beautiful villages up in the mountains.We both laid some ghosts and shared memories of our parents and homelife which we hadnt aired for over 30 years.She lives a long way from me and we dont see each other as much as we would like to and I would love to send her this book about The 3 Greek sisters to show how much I love her,also how much i loved that special time with her and to remind her of a magical time in Greece.

Sonny

says:

Around the Greek Table reminds me of my family’s dear friends, the BALAKOs, who were from the Isle of Patmos. They migrated to south Alabama and operated a great restaurant serving general American food. We were fortunate in that we were always expected to sit at the family table at the restaurant. Around that Greek Table, we had some wonderful Greek food, some of which I still prepare.

says:

My daughter and I have always been very close and now that she is 22 we are in the kitchen together more often. She teaches me how to make thai, curries and shushi and I teach her how to make my favourites like perogies, spanakopita and dolmades.Those are the moments I cherish.

says:

Just the fact that there are so many vegetarian recipe in the book makes it appealing to me!

Some of my most favorite memories of times with my brother Stephen are of him and I together in the kitchen. We were together there just a year ago also – the times we get to cook together though are far and few between anymore because we live so far away from each other.

Mike Thomas

says:

My sisters and I are from a Lebanese family. Every year when we travel to Kentucky to be together as a family we always cook Lebanese food one day. The whole family is there! We make this dish that consists of Lima Beans, Tomatoes and spices, notably cinnamon. It’s a very subtle taste. One year each of us “added” the spices to the dish. As you can imagine tomato sauce with a lot of Cinnamon isn’t very tasty! The parents made remarks about the younger generation cooking Lebanese food & the dogs wouldn’t eat it. We laugh now, but at the time it was uncomfortable.

Lena Gillespie

says:

Hi Peter thanks for all the wonderful recipes and stories that you share with us daily. My fondest memory is of my cousin and I. We were like sisters, so close. She always spent Christmas Eve at my house..we used to help my mother bake a huge amount of cookies and then the family would enjoy them while we watched White Christmas. Now she lives in BC with her own Family..and oddly enough the tradition of baking cookies and watching White Christmas has carried through to both our families…with an added phone call during it from across the country. Happy Holdiays Peter!… :)

says:

Great post, Peter! My favourite sibling memory is the day I baked for the very first time. I made an apple pie from scratch while my family out. When my brothers came back, both refused to believe that I had actually made it because it looked and tasted so go. I still tease them about it!

says:

My eldest brother has a talent for languages and did from an early age. I remember him coming home from french classes aged 9 and teaching me aged five what he had learned! Who would have thought then that we would both end up learning Greek? He lived here for a while and I’ve lived here for years now! BTW He now knows at lest 8 languages but I’m glad he didn’t teach them all to me!

Andrea

says:

I absolutely cannot choose a favorite memory…way too many favorites! With Christmas coming up, I will say that this is a funny memory we always tease about. Every Christmas morning when my brother and sister would wake me saying “Santa was here, hurry so we can open presents!!!” I, not being much of a morning person, would swing my arms and legs to get them to leave me alone. They were always so mad because I would hit them! And it hurt. Finally, I would get out of be. I did outgrow this!!! LOL.
Now I have a daughter who is 4 and she does the same thing. My son gets so mad and I just have to laugh!
Great book! I love Greek food. My husband is actually Greek, so I have a lot of family gatherings with wonderful greek food.

says:

I am one of those only children. So, my best sibling memories are of my children. I have seen them love and care for each other in a way I never understood before. There are too many good memories I have of them. Just last night, our eldest son held out his arms to his baby sister and kept her in his lap while he comforted her from a fall she took. I don’t think they would learn this empathy and concern so easily without each other.

Katie

says:

My fondest memory of my sister was the time we were eating spaghetti together as children, and the bowl moved on the table. I’m sure that there was condensation under the base, and the the table wasn’t entirely flat, but for weeks we were convinced we had a poltergeist!

says:

Sounds like a great occasion and a great group of sisters. I don’t have siblings, but I do have a cousin I am very close to – we are 4 months apart in age. My fondest memories are spending holidays with her, and playing pranks on my grandparents! She was always the instigator, of course! ;)

Sophia

says:

When my sister Eleni and I were little, we would have tickling contests. We’d take turns tickling one another and see who could go the longest without having to burst out laughing.

says:

I was always the one who “played” in the kitchen when I was a child – my sister was out with the horses, my brother working on projects – and I was reading cookbooks for inspiration and fun – and to experiment on my family (my mother was very glad to hand over the reins a few times a week).

One night I cooked “steak au poivre” (because I was all about spices and foreign words that month) and set it before my brother, as the rest of my family were going to be home late.

He swooned at the aroma but I asked him to wait for grace before tasting – so he licked it instead. 1/4 inch of crushed peppercorns encrusted the steak – and he was duly admonished!!

I don’t think that was telepathy in action, though…

Ann

says:

I’m the sibling who was most interested in cooking. My sister once made a cake that called for buttermilk, which we were out of. My mother told her she could substitute regular milk mixed with a little vinegar. Unfortunately, she used tarragon vinegar. After that very strange tasting chocolate cake, my sister pretty much stayed out of the kitchen!

says:

I’ve recently been welcomed into a Greek family through my husband, and I have to say they are the most giving and passionate people I’ve ever met. I’ve only met them once in person, but I instantly felt a connection to their spirit and culture. They’re very loving and very accepting and that’s something I’ve had very little of with my own family. We’re going back to Greece for Christmas and I’m really looking forward to bonding more with his mother in the kitchen. We may not speak the same language, but we both have a passion for cooking so I’m sure we’ll figure it out!

Courtney

says:

Family Memory…
How do I choose just one?! Eating homemade buttermilk ice cream every time we visited my grand and great-grand parents; making homemade chocolate chip cookies with my mom every weekend growing up; the fact that my mom never knew fudge could harden into squares because she grew up eating it with a spoon from the bowl with all her siblings before it cooled and hardened; making the most delicious homemade cinnamon rolls with my family every winter; learning to cook delicious Greek food from my in-laws…so many wonderful memories of family and food!!! Happy holidays!!

says:

I love my family. We have so many great memories. I have an older brother who lived in Italy for two years. He wrote me every week-via snail mail, we became really close during those two years. I learned a lot about him and some important life lessons. He is the best…and yes, he took me back to Italy for a vacation:)

says:

What a great way to share sisterly love and a fondness of food.

One of my many favorite sibling memories, and there are many, as there are 4 siblings, is the 2 week trip I took with my sister to HK and singapore last year. It was the first time we spent considerable time together as adults and we really got to know each other.

says:

That’s beautiful, I admire their perseverance and their strength and hope to some day accomplish the same.

There is no one I feel more at ease with than my THREE sisters. I know many people that cannot say the same about their siblings, but we have been as close as can be from children and adore each other just the same as adults. And I hope and pray that we continue as such for many, many, many years to come.

says:

Yes, please. I would like the three sisters. Thanks Peter! :)

My fondest childhood memory is when i was fishing by a lake with my brother when i had the good idea to push him into the water. I got two black eyes as a result. Fun!

Jenifer Louise

says:

Many, many years ago my little sister, father and I were driving aross Iowa and Illinois to visit my dad’s family. In the middle of “No-where” Illinois, my little sister had to go to the bathroom…and bad. She was probably about 6 or 7 and the time, and waiting was not an option. So my father pulled off on an exit, only to find that the gas station we saw from the interstate was closed. We kept driving in hopes of finding another one, but unfortunately we just found ourselves lost. My dad was of course angry and frustrated, I had to pee now too and my poor little sister was just in tears because she thought we were lost for ever and it was all her fault. Finally we found civilization and my 6 year old sister said “We’re going to look back at this many years from now and we’ll realize it brought us closer together.” It’s just one of those moments that I remember and it makes me smile and my eyes tear up a little.

Deb

says:

I don’t have sisters or brothers but as a young child I spent a great deal of time with cousins. My fondest memory is at Christmas when yiayia would make up boxes of Greek cookies for us to take home (only my mother made Greek cookies out of all her family and not very often). Grammie kept the cookies on the front porch to keep them cool and fresh. One year there were six cousins (all girls) spending time together. She went to the front porch to get the cookies and there weren’t quite as many there as she had baked and fried. She was quick with a “that’s okay, I’ll make more”, our mothers weren’t so kind!

Evan

says:

A couple of weeks after my father had fixed up our previously-unfinished basement, my brother and I were engaged in one of our frequent “wrestling matches” (TV wrestling, not real wrestling). At one point we were facing each other, grabbing onto each other’s arms the way the TV wrestlers do. As we were grappling, I gave him a shove and pushed him into the wall. He suddenly had a horrified look on his face – his butt had hit the wall and left a huge dent in it – about 30cm wide, 20 cm high, and 3 cm deep. We had neither the equipment nor skills to do a proper repair job (we were about 13-14 at the time), so the best we could do was fill the huge hole with drywall “mud”. We then took turns sitting in front of the repair with a blow dryer, trying to get it to dry enough so that we could paint it so that, hopefully, my dad wouldn’t notice. Well, he figured it out the next day when he saw the lawn chair with the two cushions we had balanced on the back of the chair so that the hole/repair couldn’t be seen. Needless to say, we were grounded for that little stunt, but we’re reminded of it every time one of us does a home repair – it’s always good for a laugh.

says:

Great work by the three of them. I wish them every success.

Unfortunately I am an only child, so I can’t add anything for the competition…

says:

I have so many memories of my siblings (5) but I will never, ever forget how my sister Lynn took it upon herself to help care for my father in his last days with cancer. Not only did she move from her out-of-state home for awhile, she also took a leave of absence from her job. My mother desperately needed her and she stepped up to the plate so I could be home with my children. Amazing woman!

Tracie Kays

says:

I feel connected to the three sisters as I am also one of three girls (I also have two brothers) and my father is Greek. My sisters are my best friends and we talk or see each other daily. One of my favoite memories is of my dad making me hot lemon soup when I had a sore throat, just as his dad had done for him.

VICKY

says:

I also am a family of 3 Greek Sisters Vicky, Soula & Georgia. Soula & I are twins and Georgia is our younger sister. I love to cook when I have time and the other 2 sisters are the cleaning staff after meals……I have many fond memories of growing up in a greek household especially the wonderful smells on Christmas morning.

Gina

says:

K I wasn’t going to do this, but the sibling thing got to me. Mamitsamou was in Greece (papous funeral), Babie had a chance to work over-time, so he didn’t pass that up. I was 11 my pasha was 4. We were hungry, soooo big sis made pasghetti with ketchup. For meat? We ran to Mickey Dee’s bought 2 hamburgers and cut the meat up, and put it into the pasghetti with ketchup. Not even close to the food my Mom used to make, but when babie came home, he ate it too just to make his pringepisa happy :-)

Donna

says:

Okay, I’m in under the wire. My husband is Greek but I’m not. (Although I could pass for a gal in the horio any day.) I have a cute story to share about my sister-in-law. (If you’re easily offended, don’t read on.) My SIL came to visit from Greece and it was her first time in Canada. She fell in love with the snow and after a day of playing in it, we headed to (where else?) Tim Horton’s for hot drinks and treats. I bought some Timbits (known in some parts as donut holes) for us to eat. Trying to impress her with my Greek and my politeness, I asked: Thelete arxidia? (Would you like some balls?) Well, in English the word “ball” can be used in many ways, but in Greek there’s only one meaning for the word I chose. My sister looked at me in horror but soon laughed when she realized what I was saying. Now when I visit her in Greece, we can’t stop smiling when we order loukoumades! Thanks Peter and 3 sisters for a fun giveaway!

Linda Gialouris

says:

This cookbook brings back memories of some of my fondest moments. I married a man from Greece when I was 19 years old. At the time I didn’t speak any Greek and he didn’t speak any English. We were married about 2 months when we left the US to go to Greece so he could complete his stay in the Greek Navy. I was totally culture shocked. I had never been outside the US, let alone Texas except for a few short vacations. I stayed for 3 months, and was treated with love by every one I met. I always worried that they wouldn’t accept me because I was the only American in his side of the family. My fondest memories are of my mother-in-law. She always treated me like a daughter, and over the years we became very close. She passed away 3 yrs ago this January, and I still miss her very much. When I think of Christmas, I think of her kourambiedes. She always made them especially for me. Then she would tease me when she caught me with powdered sugar on my clothes or face, evidence that I was sneaking her cookies!

says:

This is great! I love to see them carrying on the tradition and adding their own special flavor.

One of my fondest memories is when my adult brother, 17 years my senior, moved back into the family home for a short time and he and I got to live the childhood we never experienced under the same roof. We were like kids again and it was a load of fun!